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Leaks reveal more details of the Snapdragon 1000 for laptops

With Qualcomm working with Microsoft to get its Snapdragon chips into Windows 10 laptops, there have been rumors that a supercharged processor called the Snapdragon 1000 is on the way to give these devices a serious performance boost.Thanks to some digging done by WinFuture, we now know (or think we know) a bit more about it: it’s going to use a relatively large 20mm x 15mm design (offering room for more cores), and draw a hefty 12W of power. The system-on-a-chip also looks to be using a motherboard socket rather than being directly soldered onto it, though this might only be for internal testing.What all of these rather technical pointers suggest is a significant boost in power and versatility over the likes of the Snapdragon 850. The Snapdragon 1000 chip is being built from the ground up to work in laptop devices first and foremost rather than smartphones.
Specs education
The reference device Qualcomm is using to test the Snapdragon 1000 is apparently running 16GB of RAM and 256GB of storage, which gives you some idea of the specs we’re talking about for laptops running the chip. It’s likely to be going head-to-head against Intel’s Y and U series Core processors.While Qualcomm’s line up of processors don’t offer blazing performance for laptops, they do offer always-on connectivity (over LTE/4G) and very impressive battery life (in the region of 20 hours), features that appeal to anyone working on the go.How much the Snapdragon’s 1000 boosted specs are going to compromise those advantages remains to be seen – we still don’t know any of the key specs of the chip, even if it’s now looking more likely to be on the way. As yet there’s no indication of when Qualcomm might decide to unveil its plans.
Qualcomm chips could be coming to Chromebooks as well
Via Ars Technica

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Apple admits some of its MacBook keyboards break too easily

You may recall that Apple is currently under fire for the design of the super-thin keyboards and keys that it packs into its current MacBook and MacBook Pro machines – apparently these keyboards are so thin and delicate that they’re more susceptible to failing.Now Apple has owned up to the issue, sort of. A new repair program page says “a small percentage” of keyboards in certain MacBook and MacBook Pro models can be liable to repeat characters, or not register key presses, or fail to respond in an expected way. If you’re hit by one of these issues, Apple will now repair the fault for free.In total, three MacBook models and six MacBook Pro models are mentioned, launched from 2015 to 2017. Apple hasn’t said whether or not the keyboard design has been tweaked in the laptops it’s selling today, but the 2017 models are the most recent refresh.
Four more years
It’s difficult to pin down exactly how widespread the problem is: we do know that aggrieved users have filed more than one class action lawsuit over the issue, and independent analysis suggests the failure rate is somewhere around the 8% mark.The new program runs for four years, so if your laptop exhibits any sort of keyboard issue within that window, Apple will do the repair for free, whether or not you’ve signed up for AppleCare. As usual with these repair programs, you can call into an Apple Store or post your device off to Apple directly.Additionally, if you’ve had a keyboard repaired on an eligible model, Apple may refund the cost for you. The next question is when Apple will update its MacBook and MacBook Pro lines, and what kind of keyboard redesign is going to be involved when it does.
Here’s everything we want to see in the next generation of Apple laptops

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Windows 10 gets a nifty Mac feature, thanks to QuickLook app

A nifty piece of macOS functionality that you might be familiar with – QuickLook – can now be enjoyed by Windows 10 users, thanks to a new app which has hit the Microsoft Store.Mac users can select a file and simply tap the spacebar to invoke QuickLook and pop-up a quick preview of said file in a window, allowing them to, for example, have a closer look at a photo without having to fully open it in an app.Spotted by The Verge, the QuickLook app is a free download from the Microsoft Store, and implements exactly the same kind of handy in-line previews when you’re working with files on the Windows 10 desktop (note that it doesn’t work with Windows 10 S).Just like the macOS function, you tap the spacebar to view the preview of the file, and tap again to close it – or hit the Enter key to close the preview and open the file in an app. You can also zoom in or out of previewed images or documents by scrolling the mouse wheel while holding down the Ctrl key.
Known issue
So, this definitely seems like a smart little piece of software for Windows 10, given that it’s free, although note this is still a working version, as there is a somewhat irritating known issue, namely that previewing Microsoft Office files could crash the app.Hopefully that will be a problem the developer can sort sooner rather than later.Mac owners who use QuickLook should be aware that earlier this week, an exploit was revealed that could potentially spill your sensitive and encrypted data – read our report for the full details. Meanwhile, hopefully Apple will patch this particular vulnerability in macOS pronto.
Some of the best laptops of 2018 run Windows 10

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The Resident Evil 2 remake on PC won’t require a scary powerful rig

A fully remastered re-release of Resident Evil 2 was one the surprise hits of E3 2018, and even better that it’s coming to PC. Somehow the best news is the lax system requirements that were just published on the game’s pre-order page on Steam.Luckily, fans of the seminal survival horror game who want to play on PC likely won’t have to incur a major upgrade as an extra price of entry into this haunted house. In fact, if you want an ideal – or recommended – play experience, you won’t even need a very recent processor.Here are the minimum requirements for playing the game on PC:
OS: Windows 7, 8, 8.1, 10 (64-bit required)Processor: Intel Core i5-4460, 2.70GHz or AMD FX-6300 or betterMemory: 8GB RAMGraphics: Nvidia GeForce GTX 760 or AMD Radeon™ R7 260x with 2GB Video RAMDirectX: Version 11
And, here’s what’s needed to play the game as it was intended to look and feel:
OS: Windows 7, 8, 8.1, 10 (64-bit required)Processor: Intel Core i7-3770 or AMD FX-9590 or betterMemory: 8GB RAMGraphics: Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 or AMD Radeon RX 480 with 3GB VRAMDirectX: Version 11
See, those aren’t so bad, are they? Granted, you’ll need one of the latest graphics cards to play the game at recommended settings, but at least it’s one of the most affordable models.Of course, these friendlier system requirements are likely on account of the game being released to the comparatively limited PS4 and Xbox One. Nevertheless, be grateful that it won’t take much to play the best survival horror game all over again on the superior gaming platform.
These are the best PC games we’ve played this last year

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Red Dead Redemption 2 rumor points to a PC version

Red Dead Redemption 2 is inbound for the PC – at least according to the LinkedIn profile of a programmer who worked for Rockstar.As reported by VG247 – and also detailed on a Reddit thread spotted by Wccftech.com – the Experience section in the programmer’s LinkedIn profile lists the games they worked on, and that includes Red Dead Redemption 2 (RDR 2).Interestingly, the employee listed the platforms for RDR 2: PS4, Xbox One and PC, and several sources have verified that the programmer’s LinkedIn profile in question is a genuine one.This would indicate that although the PC version hasn’t been officially announced, it’s in the works. At this stage, however, it’s still a rumor to be treated with caution (it could be a simple mistake on the LinkedIn profile, for instance).
Time will tell
That said, it certainly makes sense for RDR 2 to make it to the PC, as it’s an extra audience for Rockstar to tap into.While the original game didn’t grace the PC – due to porting the sprawling code being a seriously uphill struggle, compounded with time pressures, if whispers on the web are to be believed – Grand Theft Auto V was eventually unleashed for Windows after a considerable delay.If RDR 2 is coming to PC, it’s likely to will follow a similar pattern, with launch delayed by a year or so. This is pure speculation right now, but it’s definitely an interesting hint of things to come for those who want to play the Western-themed open world sequel on the desktop PC with a quick-draw gaming mouse and keyboard combination.Red Dead Redemption 2 is slated for release on October 26 for PS4 and Xbox One, so hopeful types could speculate on a summer 2019 release on PC. The hype train is slowly gathering steam, and a fresh trailer released last month built up some serious anticipation for the game.
Red Dead Redemption 2 release date, news and rumors

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Open source: it’s not the code, it’s people

The need for open source security management became front-page news last year thanks to a major data breach at one of the world’s largest credit reporting agencies, Equifax. Equifax maintains a vast amount of sensitive personal and financial information for residents of North America and the United Kingdom. It also used Apache Struts in its online disputes portal web application, and for reasons still unclear, a vulnerable version of Struts in that portal was not fixed, even though Equifax was aware of the need to patch. The 2017 Equifax breach ended up compromising the personal information of over 148 million U.S. consumers, nearly 700,000 U.K. residents, and more than 19,000 Canadian customers.The vulnerability’s disclosure in March 2017 and the news about the Equifax breach in September seemed to have little effect on prompting other organisations to investigate their applications for the Struts vulnerability. OF the codebases audited for the 2018 Open Source Security and Risk Analysis (OSSRA) report,  8% were found to contain Apache Struts, and of those, a third contained the Struts vulnerability that resulted in the Equifax breach.That’s just one of the findings from the anonymised data of over 1,100 commercial codebases of 500+ customers audited in 2017 by the Black Duck by Synopsys On-Demand team. The OSSRA report is designed to provide an in-depth look at the state of open source security, license compliance, and code-quality risk in commercial software.Probably the biggest takeaway from this year’s OSSRA report is that many companies are doing a poor job of keeping the open source components in their software patched and up-to-date.
Open source is pervasive. So are unpatched open source vulnerabilities
Open source is pervasive in every codebase in applications used across a variety of industries. Business sectors represented in the OSSRA report include the automotive, big data, cybersecurity, enterprise software, financial services, healthcare, Internet of Things (IoT), manufacturing, and mobile app markets. The OSSRA study found open source components in 96% of the applications scanned last year, with an average of 257 open source components per codebase.Seventy-eight per cent of the codebases examined contained at least one unpatched vulnerability, with an average of 64 known vulnerabilities per codebase. In the Internet of Things, where 77% of the code was found to be open source, the audits found an average of 677 vulnerabilities per application. Seventeen per cent of the audited codebases contained a named vulnerability, such as Heartbleed, Drown, or Poodle. Poodle was found in 8% of the codebases scanned, Freak and Drown were found in 5% and – discouragingly – Heartbleed was found in 4% of the scanned codebases, even after several well-publicised exploits.Over four years after its disclosure, a number of organisations are still vulnerable to exploitation because of the Heartbleed bug, a critical security flaw that can expose secure communications. In one example that demonstrates the consequences of not patching software, a six-figure fine was issued in 2017 to Gloucester City Council because the council failed to ensure open source software it was using was updated to fix the Heartbleed vulnerability. An attacker was able to download over 30,000 emails from a senior officer’s mailbox containing financial and sensitive personal information on past and current employees.The lesson to be learned is that every organisation should include open source identification and management in its application security program, especially with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) now in effect. GDPR mandates that all companies processing and holding the personal data of European citizens must protect that information – regardless of where it is sent, processed, or stored – and proof of protection must be verified. In addition to examining custom source code for vulnerabilities, ensure that the open source you use is not introducing hidden security vulnerabilities that could place your organisation in GDPR violation. 
You can’t ‘fire and forget’ with open source
Open source is not less secure than proprietary code. But neither is it more secure. All software has vulnerabilities, whether proprietary or open source. The open source community does an exemplary job of discovering and reporting vulnerabilities (over 4,800 reported in 2017 alone), as well as issuing patches, usually at the same time as the public disclosure. But an alarming number of companies simply aren’t applying patches.Unlike commercial software, where updates are automatically pushed to users, open source has a pull support model—you are responsible for keeping track of both vulnerabilities and fixes and updates for the open source you use. If you don’t have processes and policies in place for open source management—especially for identifying and patching known vulnerabilities in open source components—you’re not doing your job. You can read the full 2018 Open Source Security and Risk Analysis report here. 

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